Health Blog

New portable UV sensors could help prevent skin cancer


Recent technology developed by the Queensland University of Technology could lead the way in reducing skin cancer incidences. The university is on the cusp of trialling the latest in portable UV sensors to test whether or not an increase Read more

Early detection can save your life


Alannah Hill recently underwent an operation to remove a tiny "invasive malignant melanoma of the spreading type" on one of her left toes. She discovered it by accident, and wouldn't have known or suspected it to be cancerous at Read more

Why should melanoma be on your radar?


Two young women tell of their close calls with skin cancer, and the importance of being regularly checked. “Melanoma can develop in moles which have had little exposure to the sun. If in doubt, get it checked and get Read more

Research shows an increase in sunburnt Australian adults


New research released by Cancer Council has shown that the downward trend in adult sunburn since 2003/04 has hit a hurdle with approximately 430,000 more sunburn cases found compared to four years ago. The research showed that on a summer Read more

New portable UV sensors could help prevent skin cancer

Sun Protection

Recent technology developed by the Queensland University of Technology could lead the way in reducing skin cancer incidences. The university is on the cusp of trialling the latest in portable UV sensors to test whether or not an increase in awareness will help to curb people’s sun baking ways.

The technology comes in the form of a Cancer Council smart phone app or a wearable UV meter developed in Western Australia. The sensors provide accurate UV measurements and warnings about dangerous UV levels and intend to encourage their users to carry out sensible sun behaviour. Dr Elke Hacker of the Queensland University of Technology hopes that the technology “that will allow people then to modify their behaviour and prevent themselves from being sunburnt”.

Read more.


Early detection can save your life

Diagnosis

Alannah Hill recently underwent an operation to remove a tiny “invasive malignant melanoma of the spreading type” on one of her left toes. She discovered it by accident, and wouldn’t have known or suspected it to be cancerous at all if she hadn’t kicked her foot so forcefully on the skirting board that she needed to go to hospital for treatment. Alannah’s doctor requested a biopsy, and later told her that if it hadn’t been spotted for another three months, the cancer would have likely become terminal.

Her story shows the extreme importance of early detection and regular skin checks.

“The main thing to remember – and I can’t stress this enough –” she says, “is that we all, unfortunately, believe we are invincible. I thought my little freckle was just a freckle getting bigger. But it was the first signs of a melanoma – which is a sign to go and get checked. Getting checked is what the doctors preach most. They despair, so often, as they lose people after hearing the words, ‘If only … if only I’d gone earlier and gotten checked earlier.’.”

Sourced from the Sydney Morning Herald. Read the full article here


Why should melanoma be on your radar?

Diagnosis

Two young women tell of their close calls with skin cancer, and the importance of being regularly checked.

“Melanoma can develop in moles which have had little exposure to the sun. If in doubt, get it checked and get it checked again,”

Read the full story Two young women tell: Why melanoma should be on your radar


Research shows an increase in sunburnt Australian adults

Sun Protection

New research released by Cancer Council has shown that the downward trend in adult sunburn since 2003/04 has hit a hurdle with approximately 430,000 more sunburn cases found compared to four years ago.

The research showed that on a summer weekend around 2.4 million Aussies are getting sunburnt – 15% of Australians were found to get sunburnt over a summer weekend, 18% of men and 12% of women.

Although the total percent of sunburn cases has significantly lowered over the past ten years, the recent increase is seen as a cause for concern indicating complacency when it comes to skin cancer prevention.

The Cancer Council has called for a new national mass market skin cancer prevention campaign to remind Australians that skin caner is largely preventable and encourage them to take steps to lower their risk.

Source: Cancer Council – New research shows almost 2.4 million Aussie adults sunburnt on summer weekends


Australians are not applying sunscreen correctly increasing their risk of sun damage

Sun Protection

Incorrectly applying sunscreen can result in the actual sun protection effect being an SPF much lower then that listed on the sun screen.

When determining a product’s Sun Protection Factor (SPF) in sunscreen testing laboratories, scientists use around double the amount of sunscreen in an application compared to that applied by the average consumer.

Sue Heward SunSmart manager at Cancer Council Victoria recommends the average person using about 35 millilitres (around 7 teaspoons) of sunscreen for each application.

Sunscreen application tips:
Use the right amount
Apply 20 minutes before you go outside
Reapply every two hours

Source – Correct sunscreen application reduces skin cancer


Some spots can be dangerous – Dannii Minogue’s skin cancer campaign

Diagnosis

Dannii Minogue has joined a campaign “Some spots can be dangerous” to spread the word about melanoma prevention.

She has urged all Australians to get their skin checked this summer, and ensure they follow up each year.

“I just had the full check recently,” Minogue said. “When I went for my appointment I was nervous and scared — but I’m all healthy. You need to do it once a year.”


Richie Benaud battles skin cancer

Diagnosis

The former Australian cricket captain and commentator Richie Benaud has revealed he has skin cancer and is undergoing radiation therapy.

retrospective Benaud has recommended that people take precautions to protect themselves in the sun.

“When I was a kid, we never ever wore a cap. I wish I had. You live and learn as you go along.”


Hugh Jackman Diagnosed with Skin Cancer

Diagnosis

After separate skin cancer removal procedures in November 2013 and May 2014 October, this month Hugh Jackman has had his third treatment.

Since his diagnosis he has been a big proponent for skin cancer check.

Below Hugh Jackman speaks with David Letterman about the need for skin cancer checks.

Below Jackman urges his Instagram followers to use sun protection.

SUNSCREEN!

A photo posted by Hugh Jackman (@thehughjackman) on

 


Doctors disapprove of pharmacy skin cancer checks

Diagnosis

Skin cancer checks performed in pharmacies are “irresponsible and inappropriate” according to Dr Saxon Smith, president of the NSW branch of the Australian Medical Association and a dermatologist.

Read the Sydney Morning Herald article


Call for more funding of skin cancer research in the hunter

Articles

A House of Representatives Health Committee is conducting an inquiry into skin cancer with a public hearing held in Newcastle. Federal Shortland MP Jill Hall is involved with presentations from the Hunter Medicare Local, HMRI, Hunter Melanoma Foundation and Surf Life Saving Australia.

“Even though we have the highest incidence of skin cancer in the world we don’t have the same level of research that we could have,”
Federal Shortland MP Jill Hall

Ms Hall says she expects key recommendations from the hearing in Newcastle will be used to prepare a report to be table in parliament.

Source: News.com.au